Accommodating slow learner

This article by the Davidson Institute for Talent Development offers a list of tips for teachers.

accommodating slow learner-51

Seeking to make a contribution to Disability Studies in Education research, this paper opens up for conversation, via descriptive illustrations, how and why our societal, cultural and educational conceptions and perceptions of human capacities and abilities need to attempt to be firmly rooted in everyday relations, in the realm of possibility (Gadamer, 2004), subject to constant critical inquiry and revision.

From an educator perspective, the term/concept “slow learner” is, potentially, one such relation.

He is especially active when he believes that you cannot see him. Although his behavior is not seriously disruptive, it is annoying.

He is especially active when he believes that you cannot see him. Imagine that you are teaching a regular mainstream class in your content area.

He is constantly moving in your class and always ready to throw spitballs.

Although his behavior is not seriously disruptive, it is annoying. He is constantly moving in your class and always ready to throw spitballs.This challenging of the term/concept reveals its complicatedness and how the professional and intellectual use of the term remains riddled with hegemonic assumptions and self-fulfilling strangeness and monstrous misinterpretations of who “slow learners” actually are.The authors explore the “slow learner” in public discourse and in popular fictional North American media representations of “slowness” and “slow leaner” in such films as reflect and but also augment its uses in educational discourse.Canada John Williamson is a Diverse Learning Coordinating Teacher Bishop Grandin High School, Calgary and Ph D candidate in the Faculty of Education at the University of Calgary.Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Calgary Canada Jim Paul, at the Faculty of Education at the University of Calgary, is engaged in academic teaching and research in contemporary curriculum design, development, implementation and evaluation and active / inquiry-based instructional theories and practices.CCIS uses strategies that look at "The child as a whole" providing students with high quality educational programs taught by experienced and capable staff that use variety of educational materials and resources.

Tags: , ,