Dating wedgwood jasper

It is white by nature but stained with metallic oxide colors; its most common shade in commerce is pale blue, but dark blue, lilac, sage green, black, and yellow are also used, with sage green due to chromium oxide, blue to cobalt oxide, and lilac to manganese oxide, with yellow probably coming from a salt of antimony, and black from iron oxide.

The earliest jasper was stained throughout and was known as "solid," but by 1829 production in jasper had virtually ceased.

dating wedgwood jasper-34

Wedgwood had introduced a different type of stoneware called black basalt a decade earlier.

Jasperware's composition varies but proportions may be given as follows: sulphate of barytes 150, china clay 35, blue clay 45, flint 35, gypsum 6, and Cornish stone 50.

Before 1781 very few unmarked pieces can be correctly attributed to Wedgwood.

There are also some interesting pieces around that are marked with USA Patent dates and details.

the WEDGWOOD mark is found on useful wares between 17 and on all wares produced thereafter until the sans serif version of the mark was introduced in 1929It was in 1769 that he formed two partnerships, Wedgwood and Bentley produced decorative ware with his good friend, Thomas Bentley.

Their production is marked with one or the other of the several versions of the Wedgwood and Bentley mark.

Sir William Hamilton's collection of ancient Greek vases was an important influence on Flaxman's work.

These vases were first known in England from D'Hancarville's engravings, published from 1766.

Wedgwood is a line of porcelain and pottery produced by Josiah Wedgwood from about 1759 until his death in 1795, and by his heirs thereafter.

Tags: , ,